Mistletoe Herbal

Mistletoe

Viscum album

PART USED: Leaf

PROPERTIES: Tonic (circulatory), Emmenagogue

SYSTEMS AFFECTED: Circulatory, Nervous

POSSIBLE USES: control bleeding, prevent and heal from strokes, strengthen veins and arteries

Mistletoe is a somewhat controversial herb. Mistletoe is a semi-parasitic plant and its medicinal properties seem to vary a bit according to what plant is acting as its host. Mistletoe has been in use for generations for nervous tension, headaches, insomnia, increasing systolic blood pressure when needed, and controlling uterine spasms and bleeding. Mistletoe also has a strengthening effect on the veins and vascular system.

Mistletoe is controversial because in spite of the long list of things that it is good for, Mistletoe contains some rather toxic proteins. Mistletoe should never be taken in large quantities, and probably not for long periods of time. Mistletoe seems to go right to work and a dose of a few drops a few times a day for only a day or two is all that is needed. Never take Mistletoe night after night for insomnia or day after day for lowering blood pressure.

Mistletoe, taken for 3 or 4 days after giving birth, is an amazing tonic herb. It stimulates the return of the uterus to normal size and tone, but dulls the pain of the contractions that it created for this purpose. Mistletoe should not be taken for any longer than 3 or 4 days at a time for any reason.

Mistletoe is used to stop excessive menstrual bleeding, bleeding after childbirth, or bleeding associated with ovarian cysts. Mistletoe is used to strengthen veins, arteries, and capillary walls. This herb should be considered for repair of damage after a stroke, or when a blood clot has been diagnosed. I find Valerian’s mild sedative, pain-relieving, and nervine properties an added advantage at these times.

It should be stressed here that there is very little in herbal literature to indicate that long-term use is a problem, but I have found that it lowers blood pressure too dramatically in some people when used for long periods of time, (and muscle testing seemed to indicate that the Mistletoe had been part of the problem). Coincidence, perhaps, but in my opinion Mistletoe should be used for a short time for a specific condition, rather than long-term.