Ginger Herbal

Ginger

Zingiber officinale

PART USED: Root

PROPERTIES: Stimulant, Tonic, Diuretic, Antiseptic, Anti-inflammatory, Adaptogenic

SYSTEMS AFFECTED: Digestive, Urinary, Integumentary, Muscular, Lymphatic, Immune, Circulatory, Endocrine/Glandular

POSSIBLE USES: motion sickness, cold, flu, fever, digestive upsets, gas, arteriosclerosis, colic, high blood pressure, chilblains

INGREDIENT IN: AD, BC, CB, COMP, EUST, FC, FS, LB, LN, PPAC, YW

Ginger acts as a carrier for other herbs (as well as bringing its own unique gifts) to the abdominal area, much as Cayenne does to the bloodstream. Ginger acts specifically on the stomach, spleen, liver, bladder, and kidneys. Ginger also stimulates the blood, but in a gentler manner.

Ginger acts to lower cholesterol levels by converting cholesterol to bile acids and excreting them from the body. Ginger, while stimulating circulation to an area of the body, also reduces pain sensations. Ginger prevents ulcer formation in the stomach.

Ginger’s antiseptic qualities make it useful for gastrointestinal infections and was considered in previous times to be an antidote for some types of food poisoning.

My favorite use for Ginger is to place some tincture or powder in the tub at the onset of any bug. Soak for a few minutes, then wrap up warmly. Be very careful not to get chilled after the bath. Stay wrapped until a full sweat is underway, usually about 20 minutes. I have used this method for years to stimulate a fever. The purpose of a fever is to burn off obnoxious little critters and stop an illness such as a cold or sore throat right in its tracks.

Ginger is high in potassium and contains manganese, silicon, vitamins A, C, and B complex, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, iron, and zinc.